inside the healing walk at lake bolac eel festival

Transcript:

Adeline Thomas: 

Ngatanwaar, Gunditjmara, Peekwoorrong, Keerraywoorrong, Djabwurung. 

Kuyang Yandaa, Yandaa, Yandaa Kuyang. 

Kuyang Yandaa, Yandaa, Yandaa Kuyang. 

Lee Morgan: 

Turn off your phone and off you go. It’s just a real connector back to the land and something I’ll never forget, as an upright human man on the earth, I thought how wonderful to walk the land again. Straight across country. 

And this idea of the Eel Walk, the Healing Walk, Kuyang Walk came up. 

Lou Hollis: 

From the second walk that I did, I’ve assisted Neil with organising it and the logistic and making it all happen and working out where we going camp and stop for lunch. 

David Allen: 

In 2005 we were privileged to have a group of people walking up the creek. They started in Warrnambool, came up the Hopkins (river) and up the Salt Creek right up to Lake Bolac, over a period of about a week. 

Lou Hollis: 

No we don't have showers, we camp rough and we camp in all sorts of interesting places, usually under tarps or in little tents and we cook on an open fire and we cook communally. 

Koorrookeet, Koorrookeet, Koorrookeet, Koorrookeet Poonkart.  

Collect in baskets; carry in baskets. 

Adeline Thomas: 

Kuyang Yandaa, Yandaa, Yandaa Kuyang.  

Kuyang Yandaa, Yandaa, Yandaa Kuyang. 

Lee Morgan: 

Started from Warrnambool to Lake Bolac, after ten years Lake Bolac to Warrnambool and walking all those directions, the Salt Creek, the Fiery Creek, all the scar trees along the way… 

Adeline Thomas: 

Kuyang Yandaa, Yandaa, Yandaa Kuyang.  

Kuyang Yandaa, Yandaa, Yandaa Kuyang. 

David Allen: 

And they were going, travelling in the footsteps of their descendants, people who have travelled up to meet at Lake Bolac for big gatherings of people after the first rains… 

Adeline Thomas: 

Kuyang Yandaa, Yandaa, Yandaa Kuyang.  

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